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A Genealogist In The Archives: 2024

Thursday, April 11, 2024

Disaster Planning for Genealogists

On November 9, 1872, The  Great Boston Fire started in a dry-goods warehouse that spread fast in windy weather, destroying nearly 800 buildings. Damage was estimated at more than $75 million dollars. The fire could be seen in the sky as far as 100 miles away.


Ruins after the Great Boston Fire of 1872

Disaster preparedness is something that every archive plans for and reviews on a yearly basis. If archives are preparing their facility and records for a disaster, shouldn't genealogists do the same?

I have long lamented that genealogists are also "home archivists". Most genealogists don't work as archivists but they do have some of the same responsibilities that archivists have, which are:

  • Collect original records
  • Collect original photographs
  • Receiving donated records (from family and distant, new found, cousins)
  • Organizing and preserving records
Would it not be pertinent to preserve these original records and have a disaster plan in place in case the unthinkable happens? It would be difficult to explain an entire disaster plan in this blog post, so here is an example of a Disaster Preparedness Plan from the New York State Archives that the genealogists can use as a guide:


This plan describes the steps necessary to anticipate, prevent, plan for, and recover from a disaster affecting records in any format.

Houston County Lions Club Records Donation, Houston County, TN. Archives

Many of the steps in this plan are ones that the genealogist or "home archivist" can implement to protect and preserve original records, photographs and artifacts in their possession. The main idea is to be prepared and keep your records in a state of preparedness in case of a disaster.

None of us know when the next fire, tornado, earthquake or flood may happen to us or our home. But we can prepare and plan ahead to save and preserve our genealogical records.



REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!



I have written a Legacy QuickGuide about this subject! Get Your Copy Today!

Disaster Planning for the Genealogist


Tuesday, April 9, 2024

How to Not Be Overwhelmed at the Archives

Since I became an archivist 13 years ago, I have had the pleasure of meeting genealogists, historians and other types of researchers. I have met them in person at the Houston County, Tennessee Archives & Museum, by telephone while they are making records requests and by email while doing the same. I always stand at the ready to help each and very researcher anyway I can and to find the records they are seeking.


Inside the stacks at the Stewart County, TN. Archives

One emotion that I encounter more times than not when a genealogist walks in the archives door is that feeling of being overwhelmed. They don't even have to say a word, I can see it on their face and feel it when they speak. I can truly relate to this emotion because years ago when I was a beginning genealogist, I would get so overwhelmed when I walked into an archive. I truly have empathy for those that are intimidated and overwhelmed by entering an archive.

Irish Celebration Manuscript Collection, Houston County, TN. Archives & Museum

Since 2015, I have been actively educating the genealogist through this blog, webinars, lectures, writing quick guides and just talking to genealogists on Facebook, Twitter and by email about researching in libraries and archives. The most important tip I can give anyone is to plan ahead before actually traveling to an archive.
  • Call the archive and make sure they are going to be open on the day of your visit. Ask them about the availability of parking. These seem like simple steps but they will help you know what to expect and to not be caught off guard which could cause you to become overwhelmed.
  • If the archive has a website, check to see if they list the records they have available. Search their website for any indexes that might have records of interest and make notes about what is found in the index to take with you to the archive.
  • Make a "To-Do List". This tip is highly recommended. If you have your to-do list in front of you and stick to it, becoming overwhelmed may not occur. Address each item on the to-do list, one at a time, moving through the list methodically.
  • When you walk into the archive, stay focused, try not to let the enormity of the facility overtake you. You are there on a mission and you want to accomplish that mission.
  • Talk to the archivist, tell them what you are looking for. Do not say "I want everything for the Smith family", rather, ask for specific records for your specific ancestors.
  • Don't be upset if you don't finish your to-do list. Some items take more time to research and we need to spend that time to research completely and properly.
These are just a few tips to help you not become overwhelmed when you walk into an archive. If you would like more tips and helps on visiting libraries and archives, you can get these great resources:


Legacy Family Tree Webinar:

"Researching in Libraries and Archives: The Do's and Don'ts"

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1142

























Thursday, April 4, 2024

5 Easy Steps to Preserving Newspaper Clippings

Obituaries, marriage announcements, birth announcements are just a few of the types of newspaper clippings that can be in genealogical records. Are you archiving and preserving them so they don't harm other documents? Yes, newspaper clippings and newsprint can harm, even damage, other documents.


Various Newspaper Clippings

The chemicals in newspaper print, if in contact with another documents, can leave an orange or dark stain. You don't want this to happen to original documents such as death certificates, birth certificates and marriage records. The damage is not reversible!

"Golden Wedding" announcement newspaper clipping, ca. 1944, Houston County, TN. Archives.

Here are 5 steps that the home archivist can use to archive newspaper clippings:

1. Digitize the newspaper clippings. This can be done by scanning or photographing them, then saving them to a computer, thumb drive or backup hard drive.

2. Make good quality photocopies of the clippings. Be sure to record the source citation of the clipping, if there is any, on the photocopy with a pencil. Many newspaper clippings don't have the date or name of the newspaper because that information was clipped off. 

3. Purchase archival safe sleeves to store the clippings. These sleeves can be purchased at any online archival materials store or through Amazon.com.

4. Only put one clipping in one sleeve. Stuffing the sleeve with newspaper clippings could damage them. Newspaper clippings, in sleeves, will insure that they don't touch any other documents.

5. File the preserved newspaper clippings in genealogy files, 3-ring binders or wherever you store your genealogical records.

These 5 steps will insure the newspaper clippings are preserved and the information contained in them is saved.

CAUTION: Do not laminate newspaper clippings or any genealogical documents. The laminating sheets contain chemicals that can leech into the documents and destroy them over time. Lamination is very difficult to reverse. Do not do anything to documents that can't be undone.

Erin Lodge No. 382 I.O.O.F., undated, Houston County, TN. Archives

Be sure to store all genealogical records, newspapers and newspaper clippings in a cool, dry and dark place. Newspapers deteriorate rapidly when stored in a warm and humid environment.

Newspapers and newspaper clippings can be gold mine for the genealogist, be sure to preserve the ones you have!

REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!!


*******

Check out these two Legacy Family Tree Webinars:


Preserving Old Family Letters: Tips from an Archivist

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1168





Scrapbooks: A Genealogist's Gold Mine

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1161


Thursday, March 28, 2024

Preserving Old and New Greeting Cards

Easter is upon us and many of you remember getting that new Easter outfit, gathering around the table to have Easter dinner or attending Easter services at church. Many of us also remember that our family members would mail out Easter greeting cards. Mailing Easter greeting cards was very popular and you may have many of these Easter greeting cards and other types of greeting cards in your genealogical records.

I have a confession to make, I have kept every single greeting card that I have ever received. Yes, I know, I have a problem. Maybe you have a stack of greeting cards from past Easters and from Christmases past. Maybe you also keep other greeting cards from Birthdays, Valentine's Day, etc.

Vintage Easter Greeting Card, Houston County Archives & Museum


Most importantly, if you have old greeting cards that are in your genealogical record collections, are you preserving them properly?

If you are like me and have kept greeting cards from various events, holidays and special occasions and you intend on keeping them, it is important that they are preserved just like the other documents in your collection.

Preserving greeting cards is very easy, it's really a matter of obtaining the right materials and being consistent in the archiving process.

Archival Materials You Will Need and can be purchased at any online archival materials store:

-Archival plastic sleeves in the size that fits the greeting card

-Archival Box, like this one from Gaylord Archival


Before the preservation process can take place, it is important to document each greeting card and digitize it. Placing a note in your family genealogy software that says something like "Easter 2016, received Easter card from Aunt Marie, she signed the card". If the person put a note in the card, you might want to transcribe that into the notes field as well. Also, make notes about the senders mailing address too.

Digitizing greeting cards can be very tedious and time consuming. However, if you want to insure that these records are preserved in case of a disaster that destroys the cards, this is what needs to be done.

I normally scan the entire card; the front, inside and back. I place those scans in the computer file of the ancestor who sent me the card in a separate folder entitled "Greeting Cards".

I also take a soft #2 pencil and on the back of the card I write the year I received the card. Hopefully, the card's subject will tell what the occasion was but if not, you might want to make a note of the occasion.

Take the greeting card and put it in an archival sleeve that is the right size for the card. The archival supply stores have all kinds of sizes to choose from.

Next, put the cards in a Hollinger box. I normally organize the greeting cards by surname and then within that surname I put the cards in date order by year.

Hollinger Box


If you have a lot of greeting cards, like I do, you might want to dedicate a Hollinger box to one surname.

The process is quite simple and gets the greeting cards in order so that they can be enjoyed and if you are looking for a certain card, they are easy to find.

Online Archival Supply Stores:

Gaylord Archival
http://www.gaylord.com/

Hollinger Metal Edge
http://www.hollingermetaledge.com/

University Products
https://www.universityproducts.com/

Light Impressions
http://www.lightimpressionsdirect.com/


REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!


Get My Legacy QuickGuide

Preserving Old Family Letters: Tips from an Archivist

https://bit.ly/2rW4Q60


Tuesday, March 26, 2024

5 Tips for Finding Unique Genealogical Records in Archives

Court records, deeds records, scrapbooks, photographs... these are some of the more well known record groups that most researchers access when they visit an archive, historical society or library.  

But did you know that there are numerous other record groups and types that are housed in archives that are almost never requested to be viewed by researchers. Why is that? Maybe it's because the researcher doesn't know these wonderful collections exist.

Wisdom Lodge #300 Newspaper Clipping, Houston County, TN. Archives
                     

Here are 5 tips for genealogy researchers to learn about and view unique records in the archives where their ancestors lived:

1. Plan, plan, plan! Every genealogist who visits an archives, historical society or library to do research needs to have a research plan in place before they step foot in the door of the facility.  

2. Ask the archivist or librarian what record collections they have that are unique or unknown to the general public. Possibly there is an index of what is in the collection or better yet a Finding Aid.

3. Ask the archivist or librarian to allow you to view all of their records indexes or all of their Finding Aids. Most repositories will have these printed and in notebooks or they will be available on patron computers in the facility or even better found on their website.

Election Worker's Payroll Request, Houston County, TN. Archives
                                       

4. Specifically ask to view the Vertical File Collection index. This index will be alphabetical and will include surnames as well as subjects such as "Erin United Methodist Church". Each file could contain just about anything. Remember...Vertical Files are like a box of chocolates, you never know what your going to get!

5. Specifically ask to view the index to the Manuscript Collection. Again, this listing will be alphabetical. The titles could be named anything, some of the more familiar titles will look something like this: "John Doe's Family Papers 1812-1900", "Erin Methodist Church 1848-1920". These collections could be contained in one box or in multiple boxes. The Finding Aid for the collection will help you decipher what is in the collection.

The next time you visit an archives, historical society or library to dig up those records on your ancestors, try these 5 tips to help you find those unique records, the ones that will tell more of your ancestor's story, the ones that will put "meat on your ancestor's bones"!



REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!

****

Want to know more about researching in archives?

Get My Legacy Family Tree QuickGuide:

Researching in Libraries and Archives: The Do's and Don'ts

PDF Version: http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1159






A Great Companion QuickGuide is:

It's Not All Online: Researching in Archives

PDF Version: hhttp://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1202


Thursday, March 21, 2024

Loose Marriage Records...What Are They?

Marriage records are one of those record groups that is a staple in genealogy research. After census records, birth and death records, genealogists always look for marriage records.


Marriage License Certificate, located in the Loose Marriage Records Collection at Houston County, Tennessee Archives


Most marriage records are recorded in large volumes or books and are referenced by Book and Page #.  Did you know there could be another set of marriage records called Loose Marriage Records?

Loose Marriage Records are a record source that a lot of archives, historical/genealogical societies and libraries who hold Manuscript Collections have on their shelves. These records are called loose because they are documents separate from the bound volumes and are considered the working papers or accompanying papers of the marriage licensing process. These files can hold just about anything but most of them have a copy of the original marriage license among other records.

Marriage License located in Loose Marriage Records Collection at Houston County, Tennessee Archives


In the Houston County, Tennessee Archives & Museum we have these types of records dating from 1871-2010.  Our files have such things as parental permission to marry letters, blood test results, letters from clergy stating the couple went through pre-marriage counseling, etc.

Loose Marriage Records can hold interesting and unique records not found in the bound volumes. When a genealogists contacts or visits an archive they should ask the archivist if they have Loose Marriage Records.  Hopefully the archive will have an index that can be quickly checked to find the surname the researcher is looking for in the loose marriage records.

Parental consent form located in Loose Marriage Records at the Houston County, Tennessee Archives


This group of records is just another example of hidden treasures in many of our archives. Some of these records have been microfilmed but very few are online.

The next time you are at an archive researching in marriage records, don't forget to ask if they have Loose Marriage Records, you might surprised by what you find.


REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!!

********


Planning that next research trip to a local archive, are you sure your ready?

Get My Legacy QuickGuide  

Researching in Libraries and Archives

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1159

Tuesday, March 19, 2024

Preserving Vintage Pressed Flowers

Many genealogists have inherited their family member's documents, books, photographs and other genealogical materials. When it comes to the books we have inherited, I hope that everyone reading this blog post takes the time to search through all the books you are given to make sure to retrieve any scrap of paper, newspaper clippings, photos or pressed flowers that your family member put in those books. Even if the books you received are not genealogical in nature, search through them anyway. You just never know what you might find in their pages.





Now, let's talk about preserving pressed flowers. Most of the time when a genealogist encounters these items in books they are brittle, fragile and falling apart. It can be a challenge to remove these items in one piece and transfer them to a medium that will protect and preserve these precious family items.

First and foremost, make sure your hands are clean and free of any lotions or hand creams. The chemicals in these lotions can adversely affect the pressed items. There is no need to wear gloves, in fact, it is preferred that gloves not be used in this instance. The reason being, when gloves are worn, they remove the textile sensation you need to feel the items. It is important to feel how you are handling the items so that they are not damaged.

Example of Pressed Flowers


If you don't feel comfortable picking up the pressed items with your hands, use a plastic or rubber spatula. Do not use metal spatulas as their sharp edges could damage the items. Be sure the head of the spatula is as big as the item so that all if it can be picked up and transferred at the same time. An ordinary kitchen egg turner or spatula that you already have will do just fine for this project. If you find that any part of the item is stuck or adhered to the page, gently use the spatula to separate the item. I have found that most of the time pressed flowers and leaves are not stuck to pages but can be removed quite easily.

Two options that I can recommend preserving and protecting your pressed flowers, leaves and ferns are:

Specimen Mounting Boxes

These boxes are easy to use and can be purchased at any of the online archival materials stores (see list below), the local hobby store, taxidermy stores and at Amazon.com. These types of mounting boxes are used for pressed flowers, leaves, preserving butterflies and other zoological items. These boxes are great to use if you plan to display the items.


Example Specimen Mounting Box from Gaylord Archival


Suspension Boxes

These boxes are also easy to use and will protect the pressed items once they are removed from the books. These boxes can also be purchased at any of the online archival materials store and at any hobby store. The clear, polystyrene box has flexible membranes in the top and bottom which conform to the item, holding it firmly in place. The nice thing about these particular boxes is they can be held and the items inside can be viewed from all sides. These suspension boxes also come in many different sizes to accommodate the different sizes of flowers, leaves and other pressed items.

Example of Suspension Boxes from Gaylord Archival


Remember, your ancestor or family member took the time to lay those flowers, leaves and ferns in books to be pressed. They were making a day of remembrance, remembering a family member or just appreciating the foliage itself. These items meant something to them at the time and it should mean something to us today. Sadly, many times there are no notes or writings to tell us exactly why our ancestors pressed these items. We are left to guess at their significance but what we can do is preserve and protect them for future generations to enjoy.

Archival Material Websites

Here is a listing of online archival materials stores. They all have online catalogs and paper catalogs that can be sent to your home. Also, be sure to sign up for email notifications because they periodically have sales and will send out email notifications:

Gaylord Archival
http://www.gaylord.com/

Hollinger Metal Edge
https://www.hollingermetaledge.com/

Light Impressions
http://www.lightimpressionsdirect.com/

University Products
https://www.universityproducts.com/

Brodart
http://www.brodart.com/


REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!


******
Get Melissa Barker's Legacy QuickGuide on

Scrapbooks: A Genealogist Gold Mine

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1413

Thursday, March 14, 2024

Finding Unidentified Photographs in the Archives

Finding a photograph of our ancestor can be a genealogical accomplishment and a reason to do the "Genealogy Happy Dance". Many genealogists, like myself, are still looking for their ancestor's photograph. Did you know that many archives have photograph collections? This fact may not be known by most genealogists because photograph collections are not in plain site and available in the research room. Photograph collections are usually housed in a records vault or in a back room in cold storage stacks.


Stewart County, TN. Archives Back Room Stacks


Photographs are donated to archives on a regular basis. A few years ago, the local newspaper in Houston County, Tennessee donated their entire collection of old photographs to the Houston County Archives. All photographs newspapers print are now taken digitally and never printed. These boxes of photographs included people, buildings, local events and many other subjects. The Houston County Archives is now processing these photographs, inventorying them and will eventually digitize them to be shared online. 

Donated Photo Albums, Houston County, TN. Archives


Photographs of individuals, groups, couples and children are a big part of most photograph collections. Also, photographs of local buildings, houses and business can be part of the collection. There could also be school group photos, church Sunday school classes and the local Garden Club available in archived photograph collections.

Whenever visiting an archive, always ask about their Photograph Collection. The archivist may first give you an index to look through. If you see something of interest, tell the archivist or make a written request that those particular photographs be pulled and brought to you.

When the archivist brings the photographs, do not be surprised if you are asked to wear gloves to handle them. The oils and dirt on hands can damage photographs if handled without gloves. Even though the photographs maybe contained in archival sleeves, gloves may still be required. 

Tools of the Archivist, Including Gloves, Houston County, TN. Archives


Ask about "Unidentified Photographs" in the collection. Almost all archives have unidentified photographs just waiting for someone to identify them. This group is usually the largest section of the photograph collection. If you know what your ancestor's looked like, please take time to search through the unidentified photographs to see if you can find identify any of the photographs. 

Unidentified Group Photo, Houston County, TN. Archives


It is always so sad when I receive a donation of photographs and most of them are unidentified. I look at the faces in those photographs and I know those people belong to someone who is doing genealogy research. I just wish I could reunite them.

The next time you are visiting an archive, talking with the archivist on the phone or emailing them, ask about their photograph collections. You might be pleasantly surprised!


REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!!


***********


Photographs Can be Found in Scrapbooks Too!!
Check Out My Legacy Family Tree Webinar:

Scrapbooks: A Genealogist's Gold Mine




Tuesday, March 12, 2024

Female Ancestors and Women's History Month

In genealogy, we say that everyone has a story to tell. As genealogists it is our job to document and tell the stories of our ancestors. Each person in our ancestry lived a unique life that only they could have lived. Good or bad, each person’s story should be told. Our female ancestors have a story to tell as well.


Josephine Annette Curtis and Agnes Marie Curtis, ca. 1920's

Female ancestors are very important to our genealogy research and should be researched with as much gusto as our male ancestors. You might think that researching your female ancestors is not productive to your genealogy research because they didn’t leave much in the way of records. I would say that they are just as important and in some cases can be more important than our male ancestors.

Lou Tennessee (Burnaine) Sanders and Lucy (Burnaine) Sanders, undated

My genealogy friend Gena Philibert-Ortega is well known for her women's genealogy research and starting March 1st she is going to be blogging for the whole month of March about the women in our genealogy research and how to research them. She does this in honor of Women's History Month and this year is her 11th year of blog posts. Her theme this year is Women's History Month Revisited. You can check out Gena's posts at her blog at this link: https://philibertfamily.blogspot.com/


We all research the male ancestors in our family to find the next generation and to see just how far back we can get. Researching your female ancestors can give you the same satisfaction. Remember, you are directly related to her parents, her grandparents, her great-grandparents, etc. Her ancestry could hold as much or more information than the males in your family. Try to research your female ancestors with the same goals in mind that you have with your male ancestors. You might be surprised at what you find. Female ancestors have a story to tell. Who’s going to tell it? Hopefully YOU!

REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AND ARCHIVES TODAY!



******



Book Recommendation!

From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes 
by Gena Philibert-Ortega


Thursday, March 7, 2024

Preserving Your Ancestor's War Letters and V-Mail

Many genealogists have letters from their ancestor's during their time in the military and especially letters that were sent to family members during wartime. These letters can include handwritten letters, postcards and V-Mail. Also, among genealogical family papers could be Western Union Messages that was sent by the soldier or by the U.S. Government to advise the family of the death of their family member or other information.


WWII V-Mail Correspondence, Houston County, TN. Archives


So, how do we preserve this correspondence? Whether these letters date back to the Revolutionary War or as recent as last week, the process is the same and very easy for the genealogist to accomplish.

The archival materials you will need purchase:

-Archival document sleeves to put the letters and documents in, these come in all shapes and sizes to accommodate the various sizes of stationary. 
You can purchase these on Amazon at this link: https://amzn.to/3Trnosj

-Archival file folders, to put the documents that are in archival sleeves
You can purchase these on Amazon at this link: https://amzn.to/48E6YB6

-Archival boxes, to put the file folders full of correspondence
You can purchase these on Amazon at this link: https://amzn.to/3v24Jd6

I am asked all the time about whether or not the letters should be taken out of their envelopes and my answer is a resounding YES! Each and every letter should be removed from their envelope, unfolded and flattened. Place the letter AND the envelope in the same archival document sleeve. This keeps the envelope with the letter it belongs to and doesn't get mixed up with other letters. Be sure to fold down the flap on the envelope where the glue part is located. Even if there is no glue remaining, it doesn't need to touch the letter.

Correspondence in Vertical File, Houston County, TN. Archives


Take the letters, postcards and other correspondence that you have put in archival sleeves and place them in archival file folders. You can put more than one letter in a file folder but I wouldn't put more than ten letters in one file folder. It is up to you how your label your file folders, however, a suggestion could be to put the file folders in chronological order.

Once the correspondence has been put in archival sleeves and file folders, the folders then need to be stored in archival Hollinger boxes. Some like to store their file folders in filing cabinets and that is also acceptable. Be sure to label the Hollinger boxes so that it is known what is contained in them.

V-Mail Correspondence, Houston County, TN. Archives


An additional way to preserve military correspondence is to transcribe all the letters and save those transcriptions electronically. So, if you have letters, postcards and V-mail from your ancestors when they were in the military, be sure to properly preserve them.


REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE!



*******

Want to know more about preserving old family letters?

Get My Legacy Family Tree Webinar:

Preserving Old Family Letters: Tips from an Archivist

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1168







Tuesday, March 5, 2024

Trains, Planes and Automobiles: Researching Our Ancestor's Transportation

As many of my genealogy friends and colleagues are traveling back home from RootsTech 2024, it got me to thinking about my own ancestors and how they traveled.

As genealogists, we should be documenting every aspect of our ancestor's lives. It's just not enough to only document their birth, marriage and death. Researching and documenting the events and aspects of our ancestors lives that come between those vital events is what tells our ancestor's life story.

Have you ever thought about documenting your ancestor's transportation? From the horse driven buckboard to the family station wagon, from the train to the airplane, our ancestors had many avenues of transportation and documenting this part of their lives can add to their life story.

Wilson Averitt and Pearl Adams, ca. 1900, Houston County, TN. Archives


My Grandfather, Cody Lee LeMaster (1909-1972) never learned to drive. He always made sure the family lived near a bus station, bus stop, near a street car or lived close enough to everything so he could just walk. His philosophy when it came to family members wanting him to visit was "If they want me to visit them, they can come get me and bring me back home". He worked each and every day to provide for his family. He walked to work at Hamlin Metal Products, Corp. in Akron, Ohio until his death on November 18, 1972. He was holding the door open for a female worker and died of a heart attack on the spot. Knowing my Grandfather's thoughts and actions when it came to transportation has helped me understand why they lived where they lived.

Cody Lee LeMaster and Agnes Marie (Curtis) LeMaster, My Grandparents


Researching all the different types of transportation for my ancestors has been fun. I am fortunate in that I have photographs dating back to the 1940's of my family members with their vehicles. Talking to family members about the different kinds and makes of those automobiles, especially those that belonged to the person I am talking to has been interesting.

L-R Lanny Barker, Ruth Athalene (Burcham) Barker, Unknown, ca. 1940's


If you are not already researching your ancestor's transportation, consider adding it to the genealogy research to-do list. You just might be surprised by what you find!


REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!


*******

Watch My Legacy Family Tree Webinar:

Researching in Libraries and Archives: The Do's and Don'ts

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=1142


Tuesday, February 27, 2024

RootsTech 2024: Genealogy Education at It's Best!

RootsTech 2024 starts in 3 days! This is the largest genealogical conference in the United States and possibly the world. This conference is an in-person as well as a virtual genealogy educational experience. If you have not registered for the FREE virtual aspect of  RootsTech, you still can! Register at this link: https://www.familysearch.org/en/rootstech/




RootsTech is one of the best opportunities for genealogists to educate themselves on a variety of genealogy subjects. When you visit the RootsTech website, you can follow the daily schedule of presentations at this link: https://www.familysearch.org/en/rootstech/schedule?day=2024-02-29



I am giving two virtual presentations during RootsTech:


Digging Into Finding Aids: The Road Map to Any Manuscript Collection
Thursday, February 29, 2024 at 1:30 p.m. Mountain Time/2:30 p.m. Central Time




Church Records in Archives
Friday, March 1, 2024 at 3:00 p.m. Mountain Time/4:00 p.m. Central Time


Attending RootsTech, whether in-person or virtually, is one of the best genealogical educational gifts you can give yourself! Register for FREE to attend virtually today!


REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!


Have Tennessee ancestors?

Check Out My Legacy Family Tree Webinar

The Tennessee State Library and Archives: A Mega Archives for Your Tennessee Ancestors