LinkConnector Validation

A Genealogist In The Archives

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Genealogy Education

As many of you may know, I am a Certified Archives Manager working as an archivist at the Houston County, Tennessee Archives.



Before I became an archivist I was a very active genealogist and I have been actively researching my family history for the past 27 years.

Not only have I been doing my own genealogy research for the past 27 years but I have been a Professional Genealogist since 2004 helping other genealogists with their research in Tennessee records.

It is very important to me to keep up-to-date on the latest records and research that is coming to the genealogy community. I also love educating myself on aspects of genealogy research in other areas, new (to me) record sources and those record sources that are online or only found in archives. And let's not forget the new kid on the block, DNA!

Lyle Family Records Collection, Houston County, TN. Archives


One question that I get all the time is "Where do you find materials for continuing your genealogy education if you can't travel to hear speakers?".

One of the best places I can recommend to get webinars, quick guides and pure genealogy education is Legacy Family Tree. And right NOW they are having a SALE that lasts until Sunday, August 20, 2017!

Get the Legacy Family Tree Webinar 1-Year Subscription for $24.98, that is 50% off the regular price:

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2737



Get the Legacy Family Tree 9.0 Deluxe Software for ONLY $17.48, that is 50% off the regular price:

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2966



If you would like to check out my webinars and quick guides, here is the link to my presenter page:

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2967




You can also view or purchase all my webinars and quick guides here:

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2967



Don't miss this opportunity, the 50% sale ends August 20th!!

***Disclaimer: I am a Legacy Family Tree Webinar presenter, author of Legacy Quick Guides and an affiliate for Legacy Family Tree. If you purchase a subscription to the webinars or software, I will receive a small affiliate fee because of that purchase*** 

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Where are the Moonshine Records?

Yes, you read that title correctly, "Where are the Moonshine Records?"

Working in an archive, in the South, one question I get A LOT is:

"Where are the Moonshine Records?"

Unfortunately, there may not be a set of records in an archive titled "Moonshine Records". But there are records that can be searched that can provide a genealogist with information about their ancestor and the part they played in the moonshine business.

Photo of police car full of moonshine, ca. 1962, Houston County, TN. Archives


Court Records:

Many times our moonshine ancestors got caught! When they were caught distilling moonshine, transporting moonshine or selling moonshine, they ended up in court. Searching local court records is a great place to find our moonshine ancestors. Moonshine was a criminal act and would have been heard in criminal court.

Local Police Records and Mug Shot Photographs:

Many of our local archives have been able to preserve old police records and mug shot records. Finding your moonshine ancestor on a police report detailing the incident would add to your ancestor's story. Finding a mug shot of that ancestor would be priceless! Unfortunately, these types of records are not a prevalent as court records but something to keep in mind when researching your moonshine relatives.

Photo of moonshine still, ca. 1959, Houston County, TN. Archives


Newspapers:

If your ancestor was caught in the act by the police, it could have been big news in a small town! Searching newspapers for stories about the police catching local moonshiners may just be what you need to find your ancestor. Seems the police like to have their pictures taken with that trunk full of gallons of moonshine or with that discovered moonshine still and then it was published in the paper.

Oral Histories:

Many of our local archives have collections of oral histories by local residents. These oral histories usually include the persons recollections of the people, places and events that happened locally. It is quite possible the person who was being interviewed could have mentioned the "local moonshiners" of the area. Oral histories can be found as a typed interview transcript or as an audio or video recording of the person.

Oral histories on DVD, Houston County, TN. Archives


So, the next time you are faced with trying to find "Moonshine Records" for your ancestor, check out the local court records, newspapers, police records and oral histories. These records just might help you document your ancestor's moonshine antics!



REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!



********

Legacy Family Tree Webinar

Using Archives to Fill the Gaps in Your Ancestor's Timeline

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2538

Do you have gaps in your ancestor's timeline? Using archives and the records they hold can fill in those gaps. Learn about unique records that are found in archives that will help to tell your ancestor's story and add information to your ancestor's timeline.






Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Where Did Your Ancestor's Vote?

For the past few months I have been processing a wonderful collection of records in the Houston County, TN. Archives. They are the Houston County Election and Voting Records Collection.

Houston County Election and Voting Records Collection, in process


This collection of records contains some wonderful information about local, state and national elections and the records that were produced locally in Houston County. These records include voters lists, election results, Election Board Minutes, lists of poll workers, newspaper items and other miscellaneous records.

I had known about election records and the great resource they can be to place our ancestors in a time and place. But going through this collection showed me that it may be possible to also find the location where our ancestors walked in and voted.

Newspaper Clipping Notice of Precincts, ca. 1978, Houston County, TN. Archives


In many states, each county is divided up into districts, precincts or something similar. Each person was required to vote in their designated polling place. This practice is still carried out today during elections. Many times we can only find the district number but if we look a little further we might be able to find out the exact building they walked into and voted.

Maybe your ancestor's polling place was changed, like this newspaper clipping below indicates. Many of the local polling places were churches, schools, the local city hall or other well known buildings in the precinct. In Houston County, TN., one precinct where people voted was at Trotter's Store. This store was a local merchandise store but on election day played a big role.

Newspaper Clipping Notice Of Change of Voting Place, ca. 1982, Houston County, TN. Archives


Many of our wonderful archives have voting and election records. Some are more extensive than others but they all have something to offer. Most of the time, these types of records are processed and housed in the Manuscript Collections. Asking the archivist about these types of records is the best way to find out if they exist.

Voting and Election records are a great resource to find our ancestors and also locating where they voted.


REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!


********

NEW! Legacy Family QuickGuide

Family Gatherings: Dragging Genealogy Information Out of Your Family

http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2680






Monday, July 24, 2017

Using Archives to Fill the Gaps in Your Ancestor's Timeline

Using Archives to Fill the Gaps in Your Ancestor's Timeline

Do you have gaps in your ancestor's timeline? Are you curious about what your ancestor's did in-between the time the census was taken? You might just find what your looking for in the many records collections of an archive.

Lyle Family Records Collection, Houston County ,TN. Archives


Working daily in an archive, I get to work with many kinds of records that are not your "normal" genealogical records. A lot of these unique records are not online and have to be sought out by the genealogist. Records in archives can help you fill in the gaps in your ancestor's timeline.



As a genealogists for the past 27 years, I have been working diligently on my own family history and that of my husbands. Recently, I was able to combine both archives work and genealogy research all in one with a fantastic result.

The Stewart County, Tennessee Archives is just one of our wonderful archives here in Tennessee and the area where my husband's family lived back in the 1800's. I recently became aware of a packet of records that had been found in the Stewart County, Tennessee Archives for a Jesse Glasgow (1816-1892), my husband's great great grandfather. I requested copies of these original records that included over 50 pages of documents and receipts that have never been microfilmed and are not online anywhere.

Inside the Stewart County, Tennessee Archives. Photo courtesy Stewart County, Tennessee Archives

One of the documents that was sent to me was a copy of a receipt for a Louisiana Lottery Ticket that Jesse Glasgow had purchased in June 1888. Jesse bought 1 ticket and the ticket number was #92074.


Courtesy Stewart County, Tennessee Archives, Jesse Glasgow Louisiana Lottery Ticket Notification, June 9, 1888

I found it interesting that Jesse Glasgow was buying a lottery ticket from Louisiana while living in Tennessee. And I didn't even know there was a lottery in the 1800's. So I did some research and found that the Louisiana Lottery was a very controversial event in the history of the State of Louisiana. You can read about the Louisiana Lottery here: http://www.nola.com/175years/index.ssf/2011/09/1888_the_louisiana_lottery_was.html

It is not known if Jesse Glasgow won anything from the Louisiana Lottery but the fact that he bought a ticket and I have a copy of the receipt from the Stewart County, Tennessee Archives helps me to document an event in his life that happened between the 1880 and 1900 census records. I had nothing recorded for Jesse between these census years and now I do because of a county archive with records that they have archived and preserved.

Courtesy "The Times-Picayune" Newspaper Photographs, an example of a Louisiana State Lottery Ticket, May 8, 1888


Remember: It's Not All Online, Contact or Visit An Archive Today!


***********

Get More Information About Filling in Those Gaps With My New Legacy Family Tree Webinar!

Using Archived to Fill the Gaps in Your Ancestor's Timeline
http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2538




Tuesday, July 11, 2017

NEW! Webinars from The Archive Lady!

Legacy Family Tree is celebrating a Summer Spectacular! Releasing brand new webinars series every two weeks!

The first series is the "Archives Series" by ME, The Archive Lady!

The 4 NEW webinars in the series are:

Family Gatherings: Dragging Genealogy Information Out of Your Family
http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2536 

Family gatherings are the ideal place to collect genealogical information. Sometimes it is difficult to get your family members to give up the knowledge they have because they are just not interested. This webinar will give you handy tips and tricks to get your family members talking and sharing the information they have and they won't even know they are doing it!




Disaster Planning for the Genealogist, Safeguarding Your Genealogical Records
http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2534 

Natural disasters and man-made disasters happen all the time. Are your genealogical records stored and archived in such a way that they will survive through a disaster? Learn from an archivist how to come up with your own disaster plan and safeguard your genealogical records from destruction.




Scrap Paper and Orphan Documents in the Archives
http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2537 

Many of our archives have scrap paper and orphan documents that are discovered on a daily basis that don't belong to any particular records collection. In this webinar find out what archives do with these records and how you as a genealogists can discover these pieces of scrap paper and orphan documents in archive to help with your own family research.




Using Archives to Fill the Gaps in Your Ancestor's Timeline
http://legacy.familytreewebinars.com/?aid=2538 

Do you have gaps of missing information in your ancestor's timeline? Using archives and the records they hold can fill in those gaps. Learn about unique records that are found in archives that will help to tell your ancestor's story and add information to your ancestor's timeline.




REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!


*********

TODAY! is Amazon Primeday! If you are a an Amazon Prime Member, check out these great deals!! 

 http://amzn.to/2u4mBT5



 




Monday, July 10, 2017

Unprocessed Records Collections in the Archives

Last week I presented a webinar for the Ontario Genealogical Society on It's Not All Online: Researching in Archives. One of the questions asked by an attendee was "Are there unprocessed records in an archive?" and my answer was YES!

As an archivist, working in an archive everyday, I get very excited when someone walks through the door with a records donation in hand. Many of our archives would not have the historical records they have without the generosity of others that make records donations. Whether it's documents, photographs, ephemera or artifacts, our archives are constantly accepting records donations.

Parker Surname Vertical File, Houston County, TN. Archives


Many archives have back rooms full of unprocessed and uncatalogued records collections. Sometimes they are even sitting in the original boxes they were donated. These records collections have not been microfilmed, they are not online anywhere but they exist and the genealogist needs to seek them out.

One tip that I like to share with genealogists is to ask the staff at the archives about these unprocessed and uncatalogued records collections. Many times these records collections haven't even been processed yet but the archivist might let you look through a specific collection. Be prepared, sometimes the archivist doesn't allow patrons to view unprocessed collections. But like I always say "It doesn't hurt to ask!" The archivist should know what they have in those collections and should be able to help the genealogist decide what could possibly help them with their research.

Many of our archives and archivists are very busy processing records, helping patrons, answer email, etc. that many records collections could just be sitting waiting to be processed. If you have made a research trip to an archive, it wouldn't hurt to ask about any new record donations or collections. There could very well be records in those boxes about your ancestors.

Houston County Lions Club Records Donation, Houston County, TN. Archives


If you are emailing or talking to the archives by phone, be sure and ask about any new records collections that have been processed or that have recently been donated and are waiting to be processed. Most likely you will have to travel to the facility to see the records but you can get an idea of what is available. 

The next time you are at an archive or communicating with them by email or phone, don't forget to ask the archivist about uncatalogued records or any new records donations that haven't been processed yet.


REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AND ARCHIVE TODAY!


********

Not All Genealogy Records Are Online! 

Get Tips from an Archivist on How to Use Archives!

Legacy Family Tree Webinar

It's Not All Online: Researching in Archives







Legacy Family Tree QuickGuide

It's Not All Online: Researching in Archives

Kindle Version: http://amzn.to/2uadrFg 

 

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Museums Have Archived Records Too!

Museum Week!

June 19-25, 2017 is National Museum Week, a time to recognize our wonderful museums and the part they play in our culture and preserving our historical artifacts and records.

A little unknown fact in the archive and genealogy world is museums have archived records too! Yes, that's right! Museums aren't just for artifacts and historical objects that patrons walk through and admire and then leave. 



I like to say that most museums have a "front room" and a "back room". The front room is filled with displays and exhibits. There could be multiple rooms filled with artifacts on display in glass cases for the visitor to enjoy.

What genealogists don't know is that many of our wonderful museums have "back rooms" full of historical and genealogical documents. 

For instance, at the Lincoln Memorial University Museum in Harrogate, Tennessee (http://museum.lmunet.edu/), they have the second largest collection of Abraham Lincoln artifacts and memorabilia in the United States in their museum. They also have a back room filled with historical and genealogical records. 

Here is a short video from the PBS program Tennessee Crossroads about the museum which shows the records room. (http://tennesseecrossroads.org/program-info-watch/?selected_segment=abraham-lincoln-library-and-museum)  

Lincoln Memorial University Museum in Harrogate, Tennessee

Locating museums in the area where your ancestor lived can be done by talking to the local librarian, local archivist or the local Chamber of Commerce. Once you have located the museum, contact them by phone or email and ask them about their archived records. 

Another option is to check out the website ArchiveGrid (https://beta.worldcat.org/archivegrid/). This is a fantastic genealogical and archival resource that should be utilized by every genealogist. Thousands of libraries, archives and museums have put information about their records on ArchiveGrid. One example is the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum-Frist Library and Archive. There are over 600 pages of record content for this one museum alone on ArchiveGrid.



So, the next time you travel to where your ancestors came from, check and see if there is a museum. If there is one, stop by and ask if they have a "back room" with archived records. You just might be pleasantly surprised.



REMEMBER: IT'S NOT ALL ONLINE, CONTACT OR VISIT AN ARCHIVE TODAY!!

*********

Think All the Genealogy Records are Online? Think Again.....!

Get my Legacy QuickGuide 

It's Not All Online: Researching in Archives

Kindle Version: http://amzn.to/2toyqjW